E: Descent to Zermatt – Switzerland

IMG_3277Struggling to hold my resilient eyelids open, I awoke to silence, disrupted only by the infrequent sounds of bed sheets brushing frantically against the mattress as our fellow hostel room-mate’s re-adjusted their positions. Thankfully Alex’s snoring had been much improved, yet this failed to even marginally contribute to a better quality of sleep for myself. Surrounding our bunk bed were tightly packed mostly empty beds. The room was cold and the itchy mud coloured blanket that I huddled under hardly covered me.  I mumbled “Alex, you awake yet?” peering down to the bunk below whilst clutching dearly to the grey blanket in an attempt not to lose any of the little heat which I had struggled so dearly to collect around me.

We were in Zermatt! The famous skiing resort flocked to by the rich and famous during the winter season. We clearly weren’t here to ski though as there was hardly any evidence of snow around us. Instead we were here to adore the many different angles and viewpoints of Switzerland’s unrivalled king of the mountains the ‘Matterhorn’. Despite being one of the tallest peaks in the Alps the mountain is special for more than just one reason. In the 1920’s the Matterhorn was selected to be placed on the packaging of the globally renowned chocolate the ‘Toblerone,’ this solidified it as a geological iconic, and rightly so.

IMG_3107Our backpacks returned their weight on our shoulders and our legs were ushered into action slowly beginning to accustom themselves. Zermatt’s most distinguishable feature is its plentiful supply of agreeable oversized chalets constructed from darkly varnished wood, most complete with balconies brimming with flowers in vibrant shades of white and pink. Underneath these alluring structures lie shops catering for two very obvious markets, either keen sports enthusiasts or the very luxurious clientèle looking for that perfect Swiss watch.

We boarded the Gornergrat railway which has roots all the way back to 1898 and began our ascent. The characterful red carriages overflowed with rustic charm  and entertainment came in the form of the Japanese tourists beside us echoing each others oohs and aahs whilst gazing at the evolving scenery behind the glass panels as we ascended the mountain. I was very tempted to join them but as I  felt slightly woozy whilst I adjusted to the altering oxygen levels I felt the better decision would be to stare outside quietly. I waited wide-eyed with anticipation to catch a glimpse of the frosted tips of the famous Swiss Alps that I’d admired for so long, usually on the endless boxes of Muesli I had previously consumed.

IMG_3022As we neared the summit, the impressive silhouette of the ‘Gornergrat Telescope’ came into view. The summit was a very peaceful area, the thinned air due to the height of the mountain seemed to drown out the voices of the other visitors that stood around us. The chilled air felt clean. It was uncomplicated allowing yourself to be absorbed  into the scenery thanks to the numerous ridges, all positioned like works of art displayed around a room, each wall offering something different to see.

Alex outlined which ones the glaciers were and described her memories of how they had changed since she was small. We had some people approach me talking in Swiss German asking for help or a photograph, their surprised faces were always a treat when Alex would be the one to address their questions. Having spent a decent amount of time soaking in the surroundings we began our hike in the direction of the Matterhorn, our ‘descent back to Zermatt’.

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Thrill-seeking mountain bikers spring bolted past us, chipping the rock beneath them with each turn of their wheels. Smiles illuminated their faces which were homogenised by to their uniform UV sports glasses. The nearby scenery that introduced us to our trek was rather barren to begin with. The ground here must only see the sun for a very short period of time each year making it difficult for it to harbour life. However an interesting shade of maroon lichens inconsistently blanketed the dark rock. The biologist in me came out here as I tried to recall a thing or two I remembered about succession to Alex.

We discovered some piles of stone, which now lay as relics to the old mountain houses that once stood there, taking advantage of these for a photo opportunity. Every so often we’d be greeted by waving newcomers passing us by on the railway, considering the time of the day these were probably the lazier folk who had the privilege of a warm bed and breakfast, giving them reason to delay their start to the day. (Only joking)
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Stopping for lunch we unpacked our sandwich baguettes that we had purchased earlier that morning and kicked back on some boulders facing a lake reflecting the tip of the Matterhorn. The lake was cleverly placed, almost as if it had been done on purpose. The terrain really did flourish as we got closer to the valley. First  lush grasses appeared hiding the fumbling Alpine Marmots as they played and scurried between their burrows. Later came vivid forests almost growing out of the nearby streams which spilled down towards the valley. The ground was now harbouring interesting mushrooms of varying sizes and colours and among these beetles and butterflies appeared to be making themselves at home.

Reaching our last stop I was sad that our hike was over. What started as a cold winter’s day had ended in me now complaining I was too warm as I sat with red cheeks in my T-shirt waiting for the next train to arrive. I felt very spoiled having got to experience this famous Swiss region and the trail had never failed to intrigue me with its changing landscapes. It’s visible through the foliage how drastically the place must change with the seasons; I guess I’ll have to make a return to find out and perhaps even learn to ski when I come back in the Winter!

Thanks again to Alex for showing me around!IMG_3271


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E: Vang Vien to Luang Prabang – LAOS

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Vang Vien

After surviving endless hours of being flung from bus to coach and back again, Kate and I despite being somewhat languorous, were eager and ready for all the adventure the infamous Vang Vien had to offer. Our bus shifted relentlessly from left to right eventually emerging from the dust which had fanned out from the worn out dirt road below us. We arrived at an ordinary looking street brimming with the usual bars and restaurants, behind us however lay a very distracting yet seemingly recent landmark. The characterless yellow beast of a building, the ‘Roung Nakhone’ Hotel dominates the local skyline and was a clear indication that we were not the first foreigners to have set foot in Vang Vien.

‘Tubing’ the most prized pass time in Vang Vien, consists of drifting down a fairly tame river which lays surrounded by stunning Laotian countryside and making stops at  bars placed alongside the river. In the past few years ‘Tubing’ has become relatively infamous in south-east Asia, with sources stating up to one tourist dies a month whilst on the river. Clutching firmly onto our rented tubes we plodded fearlessly towards the first station to see what all the fuss was about.

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Instantaneously we were bombarded with a party atmosphere, although exciting it was fairly confusing given the time of day. The short red skinned bar representative hopped about the place beaming with excitement, we grabbed a beer each whilst glancing at each other nervously. A lively bar in the heat at 2pm felt more than a little peculiar. Feeling slightly intimidated by the overly enthusiastic bar rep we allowed little time to be spared before escaping to the nearby lake.

Crisp and refreshing, the water enveloped all the folds in our skin. Above us there was nothing but sky and more jaw dropping examples of the serene mountainous scenery Laos had to offer. Perching back and peering upwards to the clouds as the tranquil river manoeuvred us downstream was such a memorable moment from the trip. You feel like a kid again, but this time there’s no pre-assembled plastic tunnel in a water-park to ride your tube down, instead you have the whole untouched outdoors literally on your fingertips. In the middle of this animated picture frame floating over a pebble floored, surrounded by peeking cliffs and no one else to be seen for a mile or so, I felt oddly at ease even though at the same time I was vulnerable to my surroundings.
IMG_9918Interspersed cliffs continued to cast their shadows onto us while we progressed further into the river and my brief but beautiful moment of blissful isolation was over sooner than expected. Greeted by the faint murmurings of Miley Cyrus we arrived at bar number two! Here we finally decided to stop being such killjoys and up our game a little. We became friends with a German couple and ordered a few drinks. I shot back a local Lao whisky followed by a few beers. This bar definitely had a better atmosphere than the previous one, there was a volleyball court and plenty of space to sit back and bask in the sun.

Two more bars followed, here the atmosphere was a little lacklustre and the only highlight to report was watching an old bearded man dance around to no music with this strange giggling girl latched onto him. Even further downstream from the bars, it felt like we had escaped the backpacker party scene and were free to explore at our own pace. Unfortunately the thunderstorm which approached us from behind sadly had other ideas. We ended up scurrying out of the river and hiring a ridiculously overpriced tuk tuk to get back to the town and towel off the damp rain whilst eating warm bowls of rice and water spinach.
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To reach the blue lagoon (pictured above) we rented out scooters and navigated our way through even more exotic farmland. This place was really special, the lagoon itself is beautiful but what made this day so significant to us was the atmosphere surrounding the little blue pool. Local families and visitors from every corner of the globe sat together laughing at the fools (including us) who flung themselves from the trees into the water.

The water was freezing but despite this taking regular dips quickly became very addictive. Sat laughing and people-watching we made friends with a Colombian couple and a Vietnamese guy who shared our good mood, we ended up chatting for a good while about the area and our home countries. Occasionally in-between we’d spur each other on to jump from the highest tree branch we could find into the water. The leaf obstructed view down at the chilly water would have been enough to make a Lion’s heart rate rise. Although reluctantly, I did end up making the plunge and despite pains all over my body, the adrenaline was a great kick and I was silly with laughter for the rest of the day.

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Luang Prabang

Sipping on our Mango shakes at the bean bag filled bars along the main strip, the time for us to journey to our final destination of the trip rapidly approached. Squeezing in beside a strangely over affectionate middle-aged Russian couple and a group of late 20 somethings we managed to slot into a comfortable-ish position with our bags piled onto our laps. I can easily say that the ride that followed was the most visually breath-taking drive I have ever experienced. Separated from us only by a thin sheet of glass, lush hills of numerous shades of green seamlessly blended into one another. Clouds fearlessly scraped the peaks of the mountains that overshadowed our feeble path shared with us only by the locals.

The unmapped villages we passed were full of souls going about their daily business, cleaning themselves, moving livestock, fixing roofs and children playing games. What an escape this was from the confinement of mindlessly rewriting notes for the past four months in the medicine library. These people were alive, surviving amongst this fairytale backdrop. I was fully aware of the perspective that these people living in this environment may feel restricted and face difficulty in meeting their basic needs but aside from that there was something very enchanting about witnessing these communities survive together in small settlements from behind my window. I mentioned to Kate if I ever end up passing my driving test I would love to come back and revisit the places we passed on that drive.     IMG_0046

If I also ever happen to live in Singapore again, and by some magical occurrence I stumble into a lot of money, I would buy my holiday home in Luang Prabang. The UNESCO world heritage city is a handsome oasis of peace which made a welcome change from all the fast paced chaotic urban environments we had seen throughout our travels. Everyone seems so laid back in Luang Prabang, the atmosphere is reminiscent of a sleepy beach town, although there’s no sea nearby for miles. We found ourselves joyful to roam random streets looking at French influenced buildings and enjoyed gift shopping in the glowing night market filled with local crafts. Even when making your way past market stalls it was impossible to feel any pressure to buy things. It was brilliant!

Late in the afternoon of that day me and Kate embarked uphill to get a good view of the sunset, from our hostel it was hard to miss Mount Phousi (Photo above). Locating a rather lonesome staircase we began our ascent, half way up is where we encountered a young novice who was attending school at the nearby temple (Photo at top of post). He approached us requesting if we could assist him by allowing him to practice his English, considering he had only been learning the language for a few months we were really impressed at how well he could communicate to us. After asking him a few questions about his home and how life was at the temple we ended up getting a surprise tour of where he prayed. We were really lucky to have found him along our way and he was so kind to us, and learning a little about the life of a novice was a really nice addition to our evening, especially after all of those stairs.     IMG_0110

Considering how little time it took to get to the peak it offered some graciously beautiful views of the surrounding hills and buildings. When we visited, the site was a bit crowded. I feel a lot of people would be off-put by this but I found it to be a great spot for people watching and for the first time I didn’t mind the crowds that much. The sun elegantly descended behind the peaks of the distant mountains while it’s light was dimly illuminated the reflections of the Mekong river below.

The Kuang Si waterfalls are the major natural attraction in the north of Laos. We had such a good time at the Blue Lagoon but if we had visited it after the Kuang Si waterfalls I’m certain we would have found it underwhelming. These waterfalls seem as if they are a fragment of heaven which escaped from the skies and landed amidst some of Earth’s most beautiful greenery. Thankfully there was no need to pinch myself in disbelief as there were plenty of freshwater fish swimming alongside us to do that for me. The lagoons dotted underneath the main falls are nature’s answer to man’s dreams of infinity pools. We wasted the whole day blissfully floating in the tranquil waters under the shade of the vibrant surrounding foliage. It was the best possible way to end this chapter of our adventures in South-east Asia.

Tips:

  • If looking for elephant rides in Luang Prabang, we really recommend you go to the Elephant sanctuary, it’s pricier than the other options but the elephants get treated so much better
  • Visit the Blue Lagoon before you make your way to Kuang Si Waterfalls
  • If you’re curious have a chat with the monks and novices, in most cases they’re really friendly and you’ll most likely learn something new

Favourite things to do:

  • Blue Lagoon
  • Tubing
  • Bars showing friends on endless repeat
  • Luang Prabang town
  • Visit the surrounding countryside to catch a glimpse of wild elephants
  • Night Market of Luang Prabang
  • Elephants at sanctuary
  • Kuang Si waterfalls
  • Mount Phousi for sunset

E: Island Hopping around Railay Beach

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After a speedily eaten Pad Thai we reluctantly boarded our boat to leave the Phi Phi’s. Our next point of call was Railay Beach, a coastal resort in close proximity to Krabi town. Our initial plan incorporated a short stay in Krabi town, but after hearing from multiple sources that Krabi was in fact a shipping town we decided follow up Kate’s friends recommendation that Railay was her favourite place in Thailand.

The Railay beach area is made up of three stretches of coast, one pristine white sand beach tucked away by limestone cliffs (above, Phra Nang Beach), another perfectly nice beach lined with hotels (West Railay) and one small stretch of coast comprised of rocks and concrete promenade (East Railay Beach). Upon arrival we set eyes on the latter during low tide where all the rocks and mud was visible and I turned to Kate, “You made us leave paradise for this!?”

The other two coasts of Railay Beach however are the perfect place to set your worries aside and relax. The only way to get in or out is by boat and transport can be arranged at various travel agencies dotted along the sea front. Prices for drinks and food at most of the restaurants are noticeably a lot higher than the rest of the places we visited in Thailand. I’d recommend sticking to the east coast for more reasonably priced dining options. My favourite activity of Railay Beach aside from the actual shore was hiking to an enchanting viewpoint and a gorgeous green lagoon tucked away behind some forest.

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The hike entrance is located between Railay east beach and Phra Nang Beach is quite challenging and for the majority of it you find yourself climbing vertically holding on to patches of red mud and tree trunks on your way up. The distinctive red mud in Railay later proved that it was ridiculously hard to remove from clothes, since that day I have still not managed to remove a few marks on my swimming trunks. They make nice if not slightly odd reminder of our time in Railay.

At the viewpoint we met a very friendly Austrian couple where we discussed the Bangkok protests, holidays and Austria’s recent victory in Eurovision. Regrettably although getting close, we struggled with the downhill climb to reach the lagoon. It was difficult to see how we would get back up once down, a rock climbing instructor later comforted us by letting us know she didn’t get to the bottom the first time she attempted the hike either.

Finishing the hike and turning to the opposite direction of the route we came, we exited from under the cliffs and found ourselves shrouded in a large group of Asian tourists, walking a little further along away from the cliffs you discover the full beauty of Phra Nang Beach, often voted as one of the top 10 beaches in the world. It’s so easy to see why. Beyond the soft chalky sands and turquoise waters the views consisted of limestone islets laced in greenery, distant cliffs and longboats scurrying across the sea.

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Some longboats even offer fresh juice and snacks, what more could you ask for in paradise? The crowds in area  weren’t too plentiful either, probably due to the limited options for reaching the peninsula. We spent the majority of the day going for dips in the water under the isolated limestone islet and listening to music whilst drifting in and out of sleep under the shade of the local flora. It was a truly brilliant day rounded off with some delicious green curry, morning glory (the vegetable) and ridiculously overpriced mango sticky rice.

Following a visit to the enchantingly noisy bats located in Diamond Cave, we opted for a small island hopping boat tour to Chicken island, Poda island and Tup island as a way of keeping us busy for the second day. The trip provided numerous opportunities for some brilliant snorkelling where we witnessed all sorts of coral and an interesting array of tropical fish. We had booked this through the restaurant which doubled as a travel agency that we had eaten breakfast at.

All the staff on the boat were extremely friendly and welcoming, seeming very proud of the place where they call home.  As the sun set over the peninsula of Railay we sat down on the sand and devoured a delicious Thai barbecue. Just before delivering us back home the boat tour ended with a visit to see some photosynthetic plankton which lit up when disturbed by movement underwater.

The time to depart from Railay arrived the next day, once again very reluctantly we arranged our transport to Bangkok before heading back to our favourite beach for a final few hours of bliss. It was there we accidentally encountered our friend from NUS Jan! In disbelief I sighted him on Phra Nang Beach and ran over to him. Both of us where pretty shocked, I mean what were the chances of us accidentally running into each other on a coast in Thailand? He decided to join us for the next leg of our journey, to the mighty Bangkok!

Railay beach was indeed one of the most special parts of our journey.

Favourite things to see/do:

  • Hike to Viewpoint/Lagoon (free)
  • Phra Nang Beach (free)
  • Four Islands boat trip
  • Diamond Cave to see the bats
  • Fluorescent Plankton

Tips:

  • East coast Railay is much cheaper for both food and accommodation
  • It might be advisable to take some climbing gear for the descent to the Lagoon

E: Broke and Alone in Dubai

Today stories and images of Dubai are circulated around the media all the time, from the news about oil funded, record breaking developments within the area to glitzy music videos where people jump out of planes above the Palm Jumeirah. I had allocated myself exactly two days to see as much as possible of this millionaire’s playground with about 50 quid in my pocket. Now that may seem like a decent amount of spending money for a two day holiday but let’s not forget how expensive Dubai is. It wasn’t exactly designed with youth backpackers in mind.

I arrived at Dubai pretty beat at around 5am, not having had more than half an hour of sleep on the plane. I could have easily mistaken the fatigued blurry images of white pillars and marble flooring of the immigration checkpoint as the entrance to heaven, missing nothing but a few clouds. Still somewhat functioning, I managed to locate the airport’s metro station, only to find out that Friday was considered a weekend in Dubai and that the metro did not open until one in the afternoon. With no other choice I resentfully dragged my jet-lagged self to the information desk and asked for a fare estimate.

I waited till around 7am before hopping into a cab, that way I’d at least get a drive through Dubai as the sun came up over the city. As we exited the airport roads my thoughts immediately turned into “where’s the tallest building in the world!?” “when will it be visible?” “is that it that one?” “no…” “will I see it now?” “what about now?” All in all it took about 3 minutes of driving before all my thoughts were silenced as I stared as what appeared to be a giant golden needle in the distance. The Burj Khalifa is visible from almost anywhere in Dubai and in the morning sun, it looks incredible.

The taxi came to roughly £10 (Remaining Budget:£40) I left my bags in the luggage room of the hotel and went for a stroll along the nearby Dubai Creek. I sought out the Bastakiya quater, an old residential area now preserved as a heritage site. The architecture was unlike anything I’d ever seen. The majority of buildings are open to the public, most of the houses had a beautiful central garden which I believe is quite common in Arabic architecture. As I was unable to get the metro for another 5 hours or so, I decided to find a nice spot to sit down and collect my thoughts a little. Completely by chance I found this little gem of a place called XVA Cafe which also operates as a hotel and gallery. The space was so different compared to what I expected my Dubai experience to be like. It was so tranquil, you could hear the swallows nearby, the weather was beautiful and the surrounding building was so warm in character.

Unfortunately most of the time, beautiful hidden places in extremely wealthy countries don’t come cheap. My mouthwatering breakfast (pictured below) came to a pretty uncomfortable £10 (RB:£30), The lunch menu was a little cheaper unfortunately I didn’t realise it wouldn’t be served at 8.30am. I definitely got my money’s worth though, as I spent a good 3 hours waiting for the metro to open and recovering from my flight there. I read for a while and did some people watching of the hotel guests, whose judgemental eyes gazed my way on more than one occasion. Probably wondering what a un-showered teen was doing hogging a whole table at the ridiculously scenic hotel they had spent years of their life working towards affording.

All in all budget wise it wasn’t going well, I decided to starve myself for the rest of the day and headed to see the Burj Khalifa! (RB after metro:£27.70) The Dubai mall situated under the Burj Khalifa is impractically large. How it still manages to be crammed with countless western tourists gives you an idea of just how big the current tourism industry is in Dubai. I can’t understand why people insist flying miles away from home and wasting so much time shopping at brand stores stocked with identical things to what they can purchase at home.

I did get a glance of the massive aquarium container within the mall, also I can confirm the worlds tallest building is aesthetically overwhelming and every bit as impressive as you’d imagine. For the remainder of the day I actually took a detour and got off at a random stop and walked for about 3 hours heading towards the coast via a residential road. I cut through Safa park (RB:£27.00) , in which there was an abundance of local families and friends holding barbecues in every direction for a good mile or so. Although seeing all these locals being social and happy brought me a great deal of joy, the smell of marinated char-grilled meats did no good for my famished stomach.

My second day was spent devouring as much as possible of my included hotel breakfast, taking a boat trip past the palm, seeing the ski slope in the Mall of the Emirates and exploring the area closest to the marina. Before finally having a last few hours dehydrated and woozy at a gorgeously sandy beach beneath the Burj Al Arab and finally taking the metro to the airport (RB after metro, food, and water ferry:£2.70). Despite the fact Dubai city doesn’t have much class or heritage left amongst it, I still get it, I get why people go there. It’s cool, it’s crazy and you won’t find better weather in the middle of December anywhere else in the world.

E: Paddy Fields and the Indigo People of Sapa, Vietnam

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Of the places I visited during the winter break one of the most touching locations I had the pleasure of witnessing was the Sapa district in northern Vietnam. Although weather wise the coldest of all my destinations, I was pleasantly warmed by the scenes throughout Sapa town and the surrounding villages.

People here are poor, and although I have witnessed poverty before I’d never seen people living off log fires and mainly consuming food they’d produced themselves. Various ethnic minorities inhabit the area including the Black Hmong, Dao and Phu Lo people. Many of these speak languages other than Vietnamese. The changes brought by tourism are noticeable, but no so prominent to ruin the area’s authenticity. Many families have converted from farming to selling souvenirs with examples including, indigo scarves and various carved stone objects. It was refreshing to see the majority of what was being sold out of houses and on the street, were products produced by the people themselves.

Exceedingly obvious is the ethnic minorities cheekily ripping tourists off, our guide gave us an indication of what we should be paying. Unfortunately I found it difficult to stop the woman selling me an indigo scarf, purchased as a gift, from overcharging me by two pounds while she was sat smiling bleakly underneath a tin roof, without heating in the middle of winter. I didn’t have it in me to refuse, especially when I thought about how little two pounds is to me, compared to what this woman could use it for.

If you plan to visit be wary not to buy from the local village kids, as although they’ll give you cheaper prices than the adults, this encourages them to skip school and continue attempting to make money from western tourists doing no good for their future. Besides any money lost whilst buying gifts I definitely made back on the food, where else can you get 73p beer? Apart from the eerily lit church located centrally in Sapa town it seems due to the French’s presence in Vietnam they left some cultural characteristics such as aspects of religion behind, our guide told us that many of the villagers refused to use contraception as they were supposedly catholic, yet still maintained some Buddhist beliefs.

Breathtaking scenery in the nearby mountains means the majority of our trip was hiking and admiring the views, with the occasional stop at some of the local villagers’ homes where our guide allowed us to ask questions, try some local tobacco and test our skill of using various farming utensils. I’d like to return to Sapa, 2 days wasn’t enough. If returning I would visit again in September during the harvest season, where apparently all the rice fields evolve into a glowing gradient of yellow. The trip ended with a farewell to our guide and boarding the night train (which one day I’m sure will become my permanent type of accommodation) back to Vietnam’s capital Hanoi.

 

E: Streets of Hanoi

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Hanoi is an undeniably beautiful city. Some people may fail to see that initially due to the noise, pollution and litter but having come face to face with those issues everyday at home meant those factors were easily to looked over.

Let me explain why Hanoi is such a great city, firstly and most importantly, crossing the street has never been more fun or dangerous anywhere else in the world. You don’t wait or follow instructions from crossing lights to cross a street in Hanoi, even looking isn’t exactly essential. Just start walking and the oncoming vehicles as if by some magic force, manoeuvre around you. Leaving you feeling a little like Moses.

Another of my favourite aspects of Hanoi is just how much time the locals spend on the street, during walks it wasn’t uncommon to pass people going about their daily business such as cooking, eating and washing themselves on the streets. It’s genuinley nice to see people spending time outdoors even if it’s not too far away from their homes. Get used to the little stools around town as they are your best and only friend when it comes to sitting down in Vietnam and are a standard features of most of the best restaurants for local street-food.

It was interesting to visit the Hoi Chi Min Mausoleum, (for those of you who don’t know what that is like me initially, it’s where the body of Hoi Chi Min (An important Vietnamese political figure) has been preserved and is stored in a glass chamber.) Another interesting cultural thing to see was the planes on display captured from the Americans by the Vietnamese. The number of planes and way they have been arranged indicated the persistence and strength of the people during the vietnam war.

The cafe culture and warm bustling streets make Hanoi one of my favourite places so far. Currently I think it has a tenancy of being overlooked due to the mass tourism funnelled into the bigger city located to the south (Hoi Chi Min City) yet I think in the future, with the right sort of growth, it could attract a lot of attention as a more ‘trendy’ type of destination, it brings so much of the Vietnamese people’s culture to surface and the city feels ‘lived in’ and ‘real’. I have no doubts I’ll be returning to Hanoi relatively soon.

Thanks again to my brilliant pen pals for guiding us almost everywhere! (Minh and Khanh)

 

E: Rainforesting

IMG_8286 IMG_8284Still uploading pictures from Tioman, whilst we were there we went for a little hike to see the waterfall. The waterfall was beautiful, the trek totalled roughly three hours. What never occurred to me about being in a rainforest is everything surrounding you, wants to kill you. I got some lovely cuts from the vines and even the palm trees were loaded with thorns. When finishing there was nothing better than jumping into the sea, of course from the amount of sweat on my shirt it seemed as if I’d already had a swim.

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