E: Emerald Glass Waters – Switzerland

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Managing to find time for one final excursion before the start of term, I held tight to my print-at-home boarding passes as I waited in the Luton airport departure zone. My chin rested on a soon to be confiscated bottle of water as I glanced intermittently up to the departures board. The last time I’d seen Alex was only a few weeks ago when she was visiting London. Almost days after I’d waved goodbye to her at Piccadilly tube station I had fixed my sights on an affordable £70 return flight to Zürich. Being the shameless nature freak I am, I sat bright-eyed and feverish at the prospect of experiencing the Swiss countryside which had been plastered and boasted about on chocolate wrappers I’d witnessed countless times growing up.

My beloved friend Alex is a Swiss humanoid of Chinese descent currently studying at the University of Zürich. We met last year in Singapore and after a few iced coffees and some waffles we decided each other was alright. We’ve experienced a lot of good times together including reaching Singapore’s laughable summit and voyaging to the idyllic Pacific Island of Pulau Tioman, this trip would be a great excuse to add to the list of memories. The only problems about our reunification would be a) that I would be reminded of the fact Alex, a non native speaker talks better English than me and b) I would need to readjust to keep up with the amount of irony in our conversations.IMG_2238

My easyjet flight was 20 minutes delayed so I hurried my way through baggage collection and border control (where I encountered a man who did not seem to like my surname) to be greeted by the familiar face I was here to see!  Within roughly 2 hours from being on UK soil I was sat in Alex’s sophisticated student kitchen devouring her pasta and juice whilst she lectured me on all the locations she wanted to go this week. (I’m sorry I wasn’t paying much attention, the pasta was really good). As the sun hid behind the horizon we met up with one of Alex’s friends who’d accompanied her to London and had a wander around central Zurich at night. From the bar at the Urania Observatory we witnessed some superior views of the slumbering city.

Following an early awakening, we dashed onto numerous trains and buses until eventually we found ourselves smittenly gazing upon the sparkling green waters that rest in the Verzasca Valley. The scenery was breathtaking as the gentle river casually meandered between the colossal mountains smothered in greenery that surrounded it. Character filled settlements made cameos outside of the bus windows frequently during our journey, By far the most prominent of these man-made creations was the staggeringly elegant Catholic church with a stone front, which along with the scenic ‘Bridge of Leaps’ marks the starting point of the trail.

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The water here is truly impressive, your eyes are left free to explore the bottom of the riverbed with only the glimmering reflections of the sunlight acting as distractions. The stone that surrounded the river bed was also of interest, the distinct layers of rock are clearly visible and the indentations of the rock alongside of the river made for peculiar places to squeeze your body into.

Our hike led us to discover more hidden gems along the river bank, the majority of our time was spent wandering in the woods that rested at the foot of the valley, occasionally stumbling into a waterfall or two along the way. We made numerous attempts to submerge ourselves the water but shamefully none were of any success. The deepest I managed to get into the water was to my knees, which within 5 seconds the glacial water proceeded to cut off my circulation as I lost the feeling in both of my feet.

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Pitying ourselves at how disappointing our cold tolerance remained, we chose a small  flat river island made of polished marble like stone as our lunch spot. The glorious surroundings made for the most breathtaking backdrop I have ever had during lunch. A definite benefit of bringing a packed lunch instead of allowing a restaurant owner to pick your lunch spot. We consumed various pieces of Swiss bread, dried meats and grapes as we sat admiring the views on our conquered piece of land. After a few hours of repeating the formula of stopping every ten minutes to admire the beauty of the same majestic mountains from a slightly different angle, we reached a bridge leading us back to the other side of the bank where a bus awaited to take us to Bellinzona.

As usual I was heartbroken to be leaving this bewitching valley with its bright emerald waters and unusual stones. There was nothing too complex about the area to discuss, it was simply a place of consistent natural beauty showcasing merely a sample great outdoor space that remain in Switzerland. Stepping out of the bus onto the attractive streets of Italian speaking Swiss town of ‘Bellinzona’ helped to comfort me slightly. The town proved to be a sophisticated little metropolis laying discreetly in the shadows of grand stone castles which peered down at the town from their position high above in the surrounding hills.

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The three castles of Bellinzona are impressive sights, all three are considered UNESCO world heritage sites and are easily reached by elevator. They offer an array of impressive views over the city, as well as the connecting castle walls are a treat to walk within. Grass has been laid between the walls making it appear as if it’s a green carpet, making the space ridiculously photogenic. The town offers plenty of cobbled streets, a healthy selection of stores to browse into and numerous eateries. As our legs ached, we were easily seduced by the prospect of a pizza cooked in a log burning oven. The pizza as predicted was delicious and I didn’t have a single shred of shame about the money I spent on it.

The Italian part of Switzerland had been good to us, welcomed by its beautiful scenery and bribed by the delicious food I could easily see this becoming a weekend favourite if I ever find myself living in Switzerland. It was a sleepy trip back to Zürich and unsurprisingly we were flat-out as soon as we hit the mattress. Well… at least Alex was. I had the beautiful melodies of her snoring to lull me to my dreams.
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Things that impressed me the most about Switzerland so far:

  • No ticket barriers
  • Double-decker trains
  • Tasty carrot juice
  • Ancient castles of Bellinzona
  • Crystal clear emerald waters of the Valle Verzasca
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E: Cambodia, the real life temple run!

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Phnom Penh

Our journey in Cambodia spring bolted into action instantly upon arrival at Phnom Penh International Airport. After obtaining our visa and having our all of our fingerprints scanned and saved by the government, we hurried into a tuk tuk and within minutes were free to roam amongst the Khmer people. ‘Phnom Penh’ usually isn’t regarded as being the most interesting, beautiful or fascinating spot in the country, yet due to it’s capital status it tends to be much cheaper to fly into as opposed to Siam Reap. Upon setting foot into our first tuk tuk the first thing out driver did was warn us not to hold our phones out for photographs due to snatching theft, a great welcome.

The roads were somewhat reminiscent of Vietnam, crowded, messy and alive. The noise is always such a refreshment when visiting any town in south-east Asia that’s not Singapore. The locals on the street consistently seem to be happier in the poorer Asian countries. Unfortunately due to the lack of time, a quick walk and some lunch was all we could manage before proceeding to board our night bus.

The window frame beside me throughout the bus journey exhibited a soothing image of transition from city to countryside masked in the colours radiating from the sunset over the Mekong River. The underlying excitement of the atmosphere may have been slightly dampened by the Swedish girl two seats behind us violently throwing up. Thankfully she dozed off after a couple of hours had passed, allowing us to do the same once night fell. A few random stops later and allowing some questionable faces aboard our bus, we seemed to stop moving. Upon exiting the bus we were greeted with the information that we were apparently at Siam Reap, when all that was visible were some motor vehicles and a shabby building dimly lit by the street-lights.   After a rather unnecessary (and scammy) 10 minute drive to our hostel (The Mad Monkey) we checked in and got a good nights rest.

Siam Reap – Floating Villages and Angkor Watt

The following day we decided to let the anticipation of the temples build a little, so instead we opted to go see the nearby floating villages. It was an eye-opening day and a good thing to see but the whole thing seems like a bit of a scam. Firstly the government collects a huge amount of the money produced from selling the boat tickets to see the village and it doesn’t seem to benefit the local people at all. Secondly we got scammed into buying ‘rice for the orphanage’ only to find out later online that the rice we bought was simply shipped back to the store to fool more tourists. Everyone you speak to seems to be a volunteer or do gooder, but then it makes you think, why don’t they just give all the food they have in the store to the kids if it’s there?

Right around 4am the next day was when we woke to go catch a glimpse of the sunrise over Angkor Watt. Our next tuk tuk driver was named Mr.Roth (kruta.roth@yahoo.com) he was around twenty-two years old and definitely my favourite driver we had the pleasure of meeting from all of my trips. We met him the day before on a random street where we agreed on around 20 USD  for one day around the temples and that all seven of us (stingy students) would fit into one tuk tuk. As we all climbed into the back it was apparent that our combined weight was causing a bit of a strain on the tuk tuk and difficulty for Mr Roth driving. We made a quick stop to call for support which arrived in the form of Mr.Roth’s brother on a motorbike, two of us would take turns to ride on the motorbike. They were very kind as they didn’t charge us any extra for Mr.Roth’s brother to help out. I remember that morning quite clearly despite my brain being almost entirely non functional. Despite the head the air felt fresh and although the atmosphere seemed quiet at first, tuk tuks and cars would flash by intermittently all heading towards the same direction. Passing the outlines of buildings and trees carved by the moon to get to the legendary archaeological site was quite magical in itself. (Probably would have been even more magical if I didn’t have Lola and Philicia’s legs crammed into mine).

Upon finally arriving, in the dark Mr Roth pointed us towards the temple and we passed under silhouette after silhouette of ancient entry gates. The moat around the temples emitted a mesmerizing faint glow and whispers of the excited tourists occupied your ears . After fleeing from a man dressed in a starbucks T-shirt begging us to have breakfast at his stall we squeezed into place alongside numerous other Brits, Germans and Americans and lingered. We waited for a good half hour or so before we began to see the distinct figure of Angkor Watt. It was a beautiful moment, while bizarre to witness all the photographs being taken constantly by the tourists. We joked that if aliens were to study humans this would be a scene that would probably be used in a documentary on human behaviour. The sun rose and due to my stomach’s ability to override my brain for the majority of the daylight hours we gave in to breakfast served by the man in the starbucks shirt. All of the temples we got to see were incredible, especially since I had never laid eyes on anything like them.

Ta Prohm and Bayon were my two favourites of the larger temples. Unfortunately though the sad truth is that the mystical vibe is completely extinguished by the masses of tourists at these larger temples. I would recommend attempting to see them during early post sunrise hours when there is a good probability there will be less people. I’d definitely recommend the second larger temple route suggested by drivers for a second day of temple seeing as it takes you around the smaller temples which are equally as impressive in terms of detail. The key difference is they just feel so much more special due to the reduced crowds and you were pretty much free to adventure inside them at your own pace undisturbed. The main sunset spot was also a bit of a disappointment, again due to the mass tourists and I’d strongly advise finding your own spot for sunset, I imagine that the ‘Pre Rup’ temple would be a nice non crowded environment to see the sunset from. The people working in all of the restaurants and shop stalls at the temples were the friendliest I had met in Asia at this point, there was very little pressure to buy which felt quite nice and I was comfortable taking a look around. One of my favourite moments from the trip was sitting down for lunch with out tuk tuk drivers and attempting a bit of communication.

When the night falls on Siam Reap you can spend your time along Pub street and the market located right next to it, regrettably we ran out of time and energy to spend enough time here to write about it but the atmosphere seemed quite fun! (Much better than Phuket for example)

Sihanoukville and Koh Rong

One of my travel partners Kate, the most organised and efficient person I have ever met did some research previously on bus routes from Siam Reap to Sihanoukville. The majority of comments she found were horror stories on delays, stolen property and break downs and these were all related to the only bus company doing the route we wanted to undertake (Virak Buntham Bus Co). Collectively we agreed on getting tickets from our hostel instead of booking this ‘nightmare’ bus. As we exchanged our money for the tickets we opened the envelope to find that the tickets were from the same bus company. Keeping calm we reassured each other all would be fine and ultimately the road was not too bad. Apart from being in very close uncomfortable proximity to a sweaty Cambodian man for the duration of the trip we eventually arrived well. Be careful however as we had friends who took the same bus company the week after and there were stories of stolen phones and tablets from the front row passengers, it turns out we were simply lucky.

We enjoyed breakfast by the beach and took a small ferry over to Koh Rong which had been recommended to me by some Bulgarians back in Singapore. We stayed at the White Rose Guest House which was basic but filled with friendly western faces. We really enjoyed ourselves during breakfast there, completely disobeying our malaria pills instructions to avoid dairy and gorging on muesli smothered in fresh fruit and yoghurt. (Always follow the instructions provided on medication!). Howie left his glasses at the restaurant back in Sihanoukville meaning our group had to split up as him and Lola went back in an attempt to find them. The remainder of us began our hike up through a mountain/hill covered in dense tropical forest.

Usually when hearing about beaches in Asia, ‘Cambodia’ usually isn’t the first country that gets mentioned. After seeing the coast at Sihanoukville I wasn’t expecting anything special to appear past the dense foliage. Thankfully to my surprise as the sound of the waves came closer and gaps between the branches became larger we discovered the most superb five kilometres of the most beautiful pristine and untouched coastline that I had ever seen in my life. This beach was far better than the screen savers I gazed endlessly at as a child. Being there presented a task in itself, to actually process and believe the image in front of us. Even until now the memory seems to perfect to have been real. The water was so clear and glimmered bright turquoise. The best thing was, we only had to share it with roughly another thirty people!. Howie and Lola made it back from Sihanoukville in time for the most breathtaking sunset I’d witnessed in my life. It was confusing not being able to decide which direction was more beautiful to look to.

As the night fell we departed in pitch black on a hike through a patch of forest in an attempt to find a dark spot to observe luminescent plankton that we were told existed in waters nearby. This was a complete failure, firstly because all the way through I was terrified we would be attacked by snakes as we couldn’t see and being at the front of the line I would clearly get attacked first, and secondly because we didn’t know that we were required to swim in the plankton for it to fluoresce. It was fun nevertheless and we proceeded to eat at a small barbecue place which was a little overpriced and the food was slightly disappointing. Our time in Cambodia essentially came to a close with a very fun boozy night across the 4 bars on the beach and playing some drinking games with my beloved ‘herd’. As we came back to our room I passed out on the bed, Kate cut herself somehow and searched in the dark for a plaster and a mysterious puppy decided it wanted to sleep with us. I had some of the best times in my life on this trip and these memories will hopefully stay with me for a long time, thanks to my beautiful ‘herd’ who accompanied me, this trip would not have been the same without them!

E: Tropical Forest in the City

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Bukit Timah is a nature reserve smack bang in the middle of Singapore. There’s a mountain biking track and numerous trails if you want to get away from the endless high rises in Singapore. It was a nice walk, nothing particular amazing to see. The summit of Singapore is pretty laughable so getting there took roughly 15 minutes. We did see some pretty funky plants though. After that it was a quick bus ride home to finish the endless assignments that come with the university’s elearning week. IMG_9087IMG_9003IMG_9101IMG_9111

E: South Pacific

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Despite the unrealistic surroundings, another factor which amazed me on Pulau Tioman was how the colours shifted during different points in the day. Early evening was uniquely special. The sun peeking through the mountains left beautiful reflections across the coast. Rays of light danced behind the palms eventually finding themselves across the golden sand. The photos taken in those two days required little to no editing, Malaysia as a whole continues to be ridiculously photogenic.

We spent our time based in a small village surrounded by locals in little tin shacks. Our beach huts blended in perfectly to the rustic feel of the place. To my surprise not only were they air-conditioned the restaurants nearby even had Wi-Fi. We were in the middle of nowhere yet somehow there’s still a wireless hotspot. Is it really that hard to get off the grid in the 21st century?

Back in Singapore we’ve been facing groggy weather. Yesterday morning I woke up to the biggest thunderstorm I’d ever experienced. Was pretty exciting. Lessons are proving difficult and last years late nights stumbling around clubs have evolved into far duller late nights in the study area listening to Theme Park, Winehouse and Jessie Ware on repeat. Most of the photos of me were taken by Alex, so many thanks to her. Unfortunately she can’t return the thanks for the photos of her as she really can’t take a bad picture so no credit should be directed at me. Enjoy the photos and the last set of Tioman pictures should be up soon!

IMG_8955You getting this? IMG_8460 IMG_8633 IMG_8912Alex got so much swag I don’t know where she keeps it allIMG_8929IMG_8766One of my favourite shots from the trip
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E: Pretty Near Paradise

IMG_8116Above and below are some more pictures from my time spent in Tioman. They can give you a rough idea of how beautiful it was, unfortunately I can’t give you a sense of how soft the sand was and the sounds the birds made. I can’t get over how special and lucky I felt to be there. Anyway I’ll be posting some  more pictures soon.
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E: Back of a Pick-up Truck

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I have just got back from literally 24 blissful hours in Malaysia on the island of Pulau Tioman. It was the most captivating place I have ever been in my life (sorry Colombo). After a painful 3 hours by coach from Singapore and 3 more hours on the boat we finally arrived on the island. Within a few steps we arrived at a few parking bays. “Ok who’s going in which car?”. The pick up trucks were for us! Complete surprise.

It was probably one of my favourite parts of the trip. We sat being shaken uncontrollably by the dodgy Japanese built concrete tracks as we climbed up some of the steepest roads I’d ever seen. All the while surrounded with abnormally large plants, bird song and stunning treetop scenery. Was not what I was expecting in the slightest.IMG_8061 IMG_8033 IMG_8057Below are some photos from near the port in mainland Malaysia

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